Statistically speaking, there are two demographics in among truckers who have the cleanest records and the fewest accident. Both women and veteran truckers are perhaps the safest and most efficient drivers in the industry. Where the two groups overlap, women veterans, and being looked at as the ideal group to fill roles in the trucking industry. Fleets are now looking to offer incentives to get women veterans licensed and behind the wheel to fill vacancies in the trucking industry.

Women Veterans Are Earning More As Truckers

Finding a decent post-military career can be challenging for women veterans. Even with accolades and achievements throughout their service careers, women veterans are still subject to the 20 percent pay rate gap that exists in most industries in the private sector. In the trucking industry, however, the pay rate is higher, and since women veterans are being considered prized assets for any fleet, some carriers are offering higher sign-on bonuses to ensure retention, which has become a major problem in the industry.

What Women Veterans Offer Trucking Fleets

While women veterans are sought after because they are among the safest drivers in the trucking industry, their impact has long reaching effects. Safe driving records have a positive influence on insurance rates, which can help fleets save money, which can be invested in growing operations, purchasing equipment, or courting larger client accounts. Additionally, when carriers improve their reputations for having safe and efficient deliveries, more customers are willing to sign on, thus stimulating growth and revenue.

Making Entry Easier For Women Veterans

We have reported in the past that legislation is being passed to make it easier for veterans to get commercial licenses. The reasoning is that many veterans are trained to drive vehicles with similar specs to those used in the trucking industry. Veterans also have careers based in safety, efficiency, and situational awareness. Programs such as Trucking with the Troops, which offers financial assistance for veterans who are seeking careers in the trucking industry, are also making it easier for somen veterans to transition from the military into lucrative jobs as haulers.

The Numbers Do Not Lie

In the past year, women truckers have had a much lower turnover rate in the trucking industry than their male counterparts. Spot audits have shown that women truckers also have half the accidents compared to male drivers. Women truckers also averaged 7,500 miles, which is a higher hauling average than male drivers have reached. With a lower turnover, lower accidents, and willingness to take shipments for longer distances, it is no wonder that fleets are trying to incentivize women veterans to start careers in trucking.